Updated: 2/7/2019

Splenic Laceration / Rupture

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Snapshot
  •  A 28-year-old man is brought to the ED following a motorcycle accident. The patient is unconscious and a trauma survey is remarkable for fractures of the 8th, 9th, and 10th ribs on the left side. The patient is hypotensive and has not been responsive to several liters of crystalloid fluids. A CT scan is shown.
Introduction
  •  The spleen is the most common organ injury following trauma that results in significant intraabdominal bleeding
    • liver injury is the most common cause of bleeding but is more often clinically insignificant
  • Risk factors
    • left-sided rib fractures
    • history of blunt abdominal trauma
    • EBV infection leading to splenomegaly
Presentation
  • Symptoms
    • referred pain to left shoulder (Kehr sign)
      • result of irritation of the diaphragm
  • Physical exam
    • hypotension
    • shock
Differential
  • Splenic abscess 
    • seen in immunocompremised patients and IV drug users
    • presents with fever, leukocytosis, and left upper quadrant pain
Evaluation
  •  Imaging
    • CT scan important in showing extent of splenic injury
  • Exploratory laparotomy
Treatment
  •  Surgical
    • endovascular embolization
      • indicated with incomplete rupture
    • splenectomy
      • indicated with complete rupture or intractable bleeding
Prognosis, Prevention, and Complications
  •  Post-splenectomy immunization
    • patients are at increased risk of encapsulated organism infections including
      • S. pneumoniae, H. influenza, N. meningitidis (SHiN)
  •  Subphrenic abscess
    • complication of splenectomy, acute pancreatitis, trauma, and other abdominal surgeries
    • presents with elevated WBC's, fevers, pleuritic pain, and left shoulder pain (referred from phrenic nerve irritation) 
  • Hematologic findings - due to decreased splenic clearance 
    • thrombocytosis
    • Howell-Jolly bodies
 

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Questions (2)
Lab Values
Blood, Plasma, Serum Reference Range
ALT 8-20 U/L
Amylase, serum 25-125 U/L
AST 8-20 U/L
Bilirubin, serum (adult) Total // Direct 0.1-1.0 mg/dL // 0.0-0.3 mg/dL
Calcium, serum (Ca2+) 8.4-10.2 mg/dL
Cholesterol, serum Rec: < 200 mg/dL
Cortisol, serum 0800 h: 5-23 μg/dL //1600 h:
3-15 μg/dL
2000 h: ≤ 50% of 0800 h
Creatine kinase, serum Male: 25-90 U/L
Female: 10-70 U/L
Creatinine, serum 0.6-1.2 mg/dL
Electrolytes, serum  
Sodium (Na+) 136-145 mEq/L
Chloride (Cl-) 95-105 mEq/L
Potassium (K+) 3.5-5.0 mEq/L
Bicarbonate (HCO3-) 22-28 mEq/L
Magnesium (Mg2+) 1.5-2.0 mEq/L
Estriol, total, serum (in pregnancy)  
24-28 wks // 32-36 wks 30-170 ng/mL // 60-280 ng/mL
28-32 wk // 36-40 wks 40-220 ng/mL // 80-350 ng/mL
Ferritin, serum Male: 15-200 ng/mL
Female: 12-150 ng/mL
Follicle-stimulating hormone, serum/plasma Male: 4-25 mIU/mL
Female: premenopause: 4-30 mIU/mL
midcycle peak: 10-90 mIU/mL
postmenopause: 40-250
pH 7.35-7.45
PCO2 33-45 mmHg
PO2 75-105 mmHg
Glucose, serum Fasting: 70-110 mg/dL
2-h postprandial:<120 mg/dL
Growth hormone - arginine stimulation Fasting: <5 ng/mL
Provocative stimuli: > 7ng/mL
Immunoglobulins, serum  
IgA 76-390 mg/dL
IgE 0-380 IU/mL
IgG 650-1500 mg/dL
IgM 40-345 mg/dL
Iron 50-170 μg/dL
Lactate dehydrogenase, serum 45-90 U/L
Luteinizing hormone, serum/plasma Male: 6-23 mIU/mL
Female: follicular phase: 5-30 mIU/mL
midcycle: 75-150 mIU/mL
postmenopause 30-200 mIU/mL
Osmolality, serum 275-295 mOsmol/kd H2O
Parathyroid hormone, serume, N-terminal 230-630 pg/mL
Phosphatase (alkaline), serum (p-NPP at 30° C) 20-70 U/L
Phosphorus (inorganic), serum 3.0-4.5 mg/dL
Prolactin, serum (hPRL) < 20 ng/mL
Proteins, serum  
Total (recumbent) 6.0-7.8 g/dL
Albumin 3.5-5.5 g/dL
Globulin 2.3-3.5 g/dL
Thyroid-stimulating hormone, serum or plasma .5-5.0 μU/mL
Thyroidal iodine (123I) uptake 8%-30% of administered dose/24h
Thyroxine (T4), serum 5-12 μg/dL
Triglycerides, serum 35-160 mg/dL
Triiodothyronine (T3), serum (RIA) 115-190 ng/dL
Triiodothyronine (T3) resin uptake 25%-35%
Urea nitrogen, serum 7-18 mg/dL
Uric acid, serum 3.0-8.2 mg/dL
Hematologic Reference Range
Bleeding time 2-7 minutes
Erythrocyte count Male: 4.3-5.9 million/mm3
Female: 3.5-5.5 million mm3
Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (Westergren) Male: 0-15 mm/h
Female: 0-20 mm/h
Hematocrit Male: 41%-53%
Female: 36%-46%
Hemoglobin A1c ≤ 6 %
Hemoglobin, blood Male: 13.5-17.5 g/dL
Female: 12.0-16.0 g/dL
Hemoglobin, plasma 1-4 mg/dL
Leukocyte count and differential  
Leukocyte count 4,500-11,000/mm3
Segmented neutrophils 54%-62%
Bands 3%-5%
Eosinophils 1%-3%
Basophils 0%-0.75%
Lymphocytes 25%-33%
Monocytes 3%-7%
Mean corpuscular hemoglobin 25.4-34.6 pg/cell
Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration 31%-36% Hb/cell
Mean corpuscular volume 80-100 μm3
Partial thromboplastin time (activated) 25-40 seconds
Platelet count 150,000-400,000/mm3
Prothrombin time 11-15 seconds
Reticulocyte count 0.5%-1.5% of red cells
Thrombin time < 2 seconds deviation from control
Volume  
Plasma Male: 25-43 mL/kg
Female: 28-45 mL/kg
Red cell Male: 20-36 mL/kg
Female: 19-31 mL/kg
Cerebrospinal Fluid Reference Range
Cell count 0-5/mm3
Chloride 118-132 mEq/L
Gamma globulin 3%-12% total proteins
Glucose 40-70 mg/dL
Pressure 70-180 mm H2O
Proteins, total < 40 mg/dL
Sweat Reference Range
Chloride 0-35 mmol/L
Urine  
Calcium 100-300 mg/24 h
Chloride Varies with intake
Creatinine clearance Male: 97-137 mL/min
Female: 88-128 mL/min
Estriol, total (in pregnancy)  
30 wks 6-18 mg/24 h
35 wks 9-28 mg/24 h
40 wks 13-42 mg/24 h
17-Hydroxycorticosteroids Male: 3.0-10.0 mg/24 h
Female: 2.0-8.0 mg/24 h
17-Ketosteroids, total Male: 8-20 mg/24 h
Female: 6-15 mg/24 h
Osmolality 50-1400 mOsmol/kg H2O
Oxalate 8-40 μg/mL
Potassium Varies with diet
Proteins, total < 150 mg/24 h
Sodium Varies with diet
Uric acid Varies with diet
Body Mass Index (BMI) Adult: 19-25 kg/m2
Calculator

(M2.GI.59) A 26-year-old man with no significant past medical history presents to the ED following a motor vehicle accident. Vital signs on presentation are T 99.0 F, BP 100/60 mmHg, HR 125 bpm, RR 16/min, SpO2 98% on room air. He complains of extreme abdominal pain worse in the left upper quadrant which has worsened over the past 30 minutes. Exam demonstrates abdominal wall rigidity, involuntary guarding, and tenderness on light percussion. Bedside sonography shows evidence for hemoperitoneum. Despite administering more intravenous fluids, repeat vitals are T 98.9 F, BP 82/50 mm hg, HR 180 bpm, RR 20/min, SpO2 97% on room air. Which of the following is the best next step? Review Topic

QID: 106394
1

Normal saline bolus and re-evaluation of hemodynamics after infusion

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(0/18)

2

CT abdomen and pelvis

6%

(1/18)

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Morphine

0%

(0/18)

4

Abdominal plain film

0%

(0/18)

5

Exploratory laparotomy

89%

(16/18)

M2

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