Updated: 2/6/2017

Vaginismus

0%
Topic
Review Topic
0
0
0%
0%
Questions
1 1
0
0
Snapshot
  • A 40-year-old, recently divorced, woman presents with pain upon sexual intercourse. When attempting intercourse after her divorce, there was severe pain upon penetration, forcing her to end sexual intercourse. Upon further questioning, she reveals that she is a sexual assault survivor. On physical exam, there is involuntary vaginal muscle contractions during pelvic examination.
Introduction
  • Vaginismus is a sexual pain disorder
    • note, dyspareunia is also a sexual pain disorder but distinct from vaginismus
      • dyspareunia results from medical or psychological issues and cannot be diagnosed on physical exam
    • vaginismus results in physical difficulty allowing vaginal penetration, despite willingness
  • Pathogenesis
    • involuntary, painful reflex spasm of the paravaginal thigh adductor muscles
    • results from anxiety about sex or pelvic exam
      • results from a bad experience with either in the past
  • Vaginismus is the only type of sexual dysfunction that can be diagnosed with physical exam
  • Risk factors
    • generalized anxiety disorder
    • depression
    • history of sexual trauma
    • strict religious upbringing
  • Associated conditions
    • dyspareunia
      • even after dyspareunia is resolved, memory of dyspareunia may cause vaginismus
Presentation
  • Symptoms
    • pain during intercourse
    • difficulty with vaginal penetration
  • Physical exam
    • pain with pelvic exam
Evaluation
  • Diagnosis confirmed if vaginal muscles contract involuntarily with pelvic exam
Differential Diagnosis
  • Dyspareunia
  • Psychological (e.g. performance anxiety)
Treatment
  • Gradual vaginal dilators
  • Physical therapy to relax the tight muscles
  • Counseling
Prognosis, Prevention, and Complications
  • Prognosis
    • vaginal dilators are typically very successful
 

Please rate topic.

Average 5.0 of 2 Ratings

Thank you for rating! Please vote below and help us build the most advanced adaptive learning platform in medicine

The complexity of this topic is appropriate for?
How important is this topic for board examinations?
How important is this topic for clinical practice?
Questions (1)
Lab Values
Blood, Plasma, Serum Reference Range
ALT 8-20 U/L
Amylase, serum 25-125 U/L
AST 8-20 U/L
Bilirubin, serum (adult) Total // Direct 0.1-1.0 mg/dL // 0.0-0.3 mg/dL
Calcium, serum (Ca2+) 8.4-10.2 mg/dL
Cholesterol, serum Rec: < 200 mg/dL
Cortisol, serum 0800 h: 5-23 μg/dL //1600 h:
3-15 μg/dL
2000 h: ≤ 50% of 0800 h
Creatine kinase, serum Male: 25-90 U/L
Female: 10-70 U/L
Creatinine, serum 0.6-1.2 mg/dL
Electrolytes, serum  
Sodium (Na+) 136-145 mEq/L
Chloride (Cl-) 95-105 mEq/L
Potassium (K+) 3.5-5.0 mEq/L
Bicarbonate (HCO3-) 22-28 mEq/L
Magnesium (Mg2+) 1.5-2.0 mEq/L
Estriol, total, serum (in pregnancy)  
24-28 wks // 32-36 wks 30-170 ng/mL // 60-280 ng/mL
28-32 wk // 36-40 wks 40-220 ng/mL // 80-350 ng/mL
Ferritin, serum Male: 15-200 ng/mL
Female: 12-150 ng/mL
Follicle-stimulating hormone, serum/plasma Male: 4-25 mIU/mL
Female: premenopause: 4-30 mIU/mL
midcycle peak: 10-90 mIU/mL
postmenopause: 40-250
pH 7.35-7.45
PCO2 33-45 mmHg
PO2 75-105 mmHg
Glucose, serum Fasting: 70-110 mg/dL
2-h postprandial:<120 mg/dL
Growth hormone - arginine stimulation Fasting: <5 ng/mL
Provocative stimuli: > 7ng/mL
Immunoglobulins, serum  
IgA 76-390 mg/dL
IgE 0-380 IU/mL
IgG 650-1500 mg/dL
IgM 40-345 mg/dL
Iron 50-170 μg/dL
Lactate dehydrogenase, serum 45-90 U/L
Luteinizing hormone, serum/plasma Male: 6-23 mIU/mL
Female: follicular phase: 5-30 mIU/mL
midcycle: 75-150 mIU/mL
postmenopause 30-200 mIU/mL
Osmolality, serum 275-295 mOsmol/kd H2O
Parathyroid hormone, serume, N-terminal 230-630 pg/mL
Phosphatase (alkaline), serum (p-NPP at 30° C) 20-70 U/L
Phosphorus (inorganic), serum 3.0-4.5 mg/dL
Prolactin, serum (hPRL) < 20 ng/mL
Proteins, serum  
Total (recumbent) 6.0-7.8 g/dL
Albumin 3.5-5.5 g/dL
Globulin 2.3-3.5 g/dL
Thyroid-stimulating hormone, serum or plasma .5-5.0 μU/mL
Thyroidal iodine (123I) uptake 8%-30% of administered dose/24h
Thyroxine (T4), serum 5-12 μg/dL
Triglycerides, serum 35-160 mg/dL
Triiodothyronine (T3), serum (RIA) 115-190 ng/dL
Triiodothyronine (T3) resin uptake 25%-35%
Urea nitrogen, serum 7-18 mg/dL
Uric acid, serum 3.0-8.2 mg/dL
Hematologic Reference Range
Bleeding time 2-7 minutes
Erythrocyte count Male: 4.3-5.9 million/mm3
Female: 3.5-5.5 million mm3
Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (Westergren) Male: 0-15 mm/h
Female: 0-20 mm/h
Hematocrit Male: 41%-53%
Female: 36%-46%
Hemoglobin A1c ≤ 6 %
Hemoglobin, blood Male: 13.5-17.5 g/dL
Female: 12.0-16.0 g/dL
Hemoglobin, plasma 1-4 mg/dL
Leukocyte count and differential  
Leukocyte count 4,500-11,000/mm3
Segmented neutrophils 54%-62%
Bands 3%-5%
Eosinophils 1%-3%
Basophils 0%-0.75%
Lymphocytes 25%-33%
Monocytes 3%-7%
Mean corpuscular hemoglobin 25.4-34.6 pg/cell
Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration 31%-36% Hb/cell
Mean corpuscular volume 80-100 μm3
Partial thromboplastin time (activated) 25-40 seconds
Platelet count 150,000-400,000/mm3
Prothrombin time 11-15 seconds
Reticulocyte count 0.5%-1.5% of red cells
Thrombin time < 2 seconds deviation from control
Volume  
Plasma Male: 25-43 mL/kg
Female: 28-45 mL/kg
Red cell Male: 20-36 mL/kg
Female: 19-31 mL/kg
Cerebrospinal Fluid Reference Range
Cell count 0-5/mm3
Chloride 118-132 mEq/L
Gamma globulin 3%-12% total proteins
Glucose 40-70 mg/dL
Pressure 70-180 mm H2O
Proteins, total < 40 mg/dL
Sweat Reference Range
Chloride 0-35 mmol/L
Urine  
Calcium 100-300 mg/24 h
Chloride Varies with intake
Creatinine clearance Male: 97-137 mL/min
Female: 88-128 mL/min
Estriol, total (in pregnancy)  
30 wks 6-18 mg/24 h
35 wks 9-28 mg/24 h
40 wks 13-42 mg/24 h
17-Hydroxycorticosteroids Male: 3.0-10.0 mg/24 h
Female: 2.0-8.0 mg/24 h
17-Ketosteroids, total Male: 8-20 mg/24 h
Female: 6-15 mg/24 h
Osmolality 50-1400 mOsmol/kg H2O
Oxalate 8-40 μg/mL
Potassium Varies with diet
Proteins, total < 150 mg/24 h
Sodium Varies with diet
Uric acid Varies with diet
Body Mass Index (BMI) Adult: 19-25 kg/m2
Calculator

You have 100% on this question.
Just skip this one for now.

(M2.GN.17.4733) A 21-year-old female presents to her first gynecology visit. She states that six months ago, she tried to have sexual intercourse but experienced severe pain in her genital region when penetration was attempted. This has continued until now, and she has been unable to have intercourse with her partner. The pain is not present at any other times aside from attempts at penetration. The patient is distressed that she will never be able to have sex, even though she wishes to do so. She does not recall ever having a urinary tract infection and has never been sexually active due to her religious upbringing. In addition, she has never tried to use tampons or had a Pap smear before. She denies alcohol, illicit drugs, and smoking. The patient is 5 feet 6 inches and weighs 146 pounds (BMI 23.6 kg/m^2). On pelvic exam, there are no vulvar skin changes, signs of atrophy, or evidence of abnormal discharge. The hymen is not intact. Placement of a lubricated speculum at the introitus elicits intense pain and further exam is deferred for patient comfort. Office urinalysis is negative. Which of the following is a risk factor for this patient’s condition? Review Topic | Tested Concept

QID: 108621
1

Low estrogen state

16%

(5/32)

2

Endometriosis

9%

(3/32)

3

Generalized anxiety disorder

62%

(20/32)

4

Squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva

0%

(0/32)

5

Body dysmorphic disorder

9%

(3/32)

L 2 D

Select Answer to see Preferred Response

Topic COMMENTS (0)
Private Note